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, edward snowden manifest tow of truth is what he is calling it. he is ghademanding the u.s. dro espionage charges against him and why he is suggesting he is is not criminal. >>> a bizarre security breach at o'hare airport. an alligator on the loose in terminal 3! what? wait, wait, wait... no, no, no, wait, wait. (baby crying) so you can deposit a check... with the touch of a finger. so you can arrange a transfer in the blink of an eye. so you can help make a bond... i got it. that lasts a lifetime. the chase mobile app. so you can. ♪ hey lady! noooo! no! [ tires screech ] ♪ nooo! nooo! nooo! hey lady, that's diesel! i know. ♪ ♪ okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash.
tapper when he interviewed him earlier this week. tapper asked him about edward snowden. i want to play what he said. >> the problem with snowden is he had access to classified information. he violated conditions under which they got those. he's a traitor, pure and simple. and i don't think you can judge him any other way. there's some people who say he's a whistle-blower. he's talked about methods and ways we collect intelligence. >> a number of people said and come around and changed their opinion but clearly vice president cheney has not, doesn't sound like he's going to. how do you respond to what he said? >> i'm really glad dick cheney is available to speak on this because i think he under scores the most important point. dick cheney engaged in some of the worst, most radical conduct in the last century in the united states and did it all in secret from lying about the war in iraq, to torturing people, to putting people in cages with no lawyers. to eavesdropping of the american people without the warrants required by law. people in political power like dick cheney want to do what t
as the leaks keep on coming from edward snowden from the top adviser to the president about what the president knew and when he knew it. first today's trivia question. what is the most populous state with one woman in its congressional delegation. the first person to tweet the correct question will get the on air shout out. the answer and more coming up next. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. i remember thinking there's a lot i have to do... check my blood sugar, eat better. start insulin. today i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said with levemir® flexpen... i don't have to use a syringe and a vial. levemir® flexpen comes prefilled with long-acting insulin taken once daily for
administration is trying to sal silence doubts about the rollout and edward snowden's latest bombshell. they listened in on friendly global leaders and american's top spy said there is nothing new. i'll talk to glenn greenwald, what he says. >>> catch a wave and you're sitting on top of the world and catch this wave and you may land in the record books. i'll talk to a surfer on what it is like to hang ten on a 100-foot ocean wave, only here. >>> we begin with big new developments in the obama care story. this is different from the political war fair you see night after night on the partisan news channels because health care reform is so i'm fortunate we're doing what we can to turn down the noise and turn up the facts. item one, a document that clearly shows when the white house got the warning the healthcare.gov website was a disaster in the making. >> reporter: cnn learned at the obama administration was warned in september the obama care website wasn't ready to go live. the main contractor, cgi issued this confidential report to the agency overseeing the healthcare.gov rollout. it w
what we see is that the potential risk to the united states of leakers like edward snowden changes the calculus of who we conduct intelligence against. i don't think there should be any principled reason not to spy on allies, but you have to take into account the risk it's going to be disclosed and that can be harmful. it underlines the extent of edward snowden's treason that all of this is out in public. our intelligence gathering has been damaged in ways we can hardly talk about. >> you talk about both sides, conservatives and republicans, are commenting about this. let's read two examples of that. one is from investors, business daily, they have an editorial. we seem to be going out of way to alienate friends and allies in recent months. they all have found to varying degrees an unreliable partner in the united states under president obama. they're conservative. let's look at what's in the "new york times" this morning. i've seen an america that was respected, hated, feared, and loved, but i was confronted repeatedly with an attitude toward america that i've never heard before.
second term in peril. edward snowden has this new manifesto that is out from russia, calls for reform in surveillance justify his leaks of classified information. we will see if he agrees with him on that. and the changing landscape of designer fashion. the top names in the country, here with us this hour to talk about that. all that and dagen mcdowell this hour on "markets now." all right. dagen: we're giving you a makeover. connell: that would be great. get him to work on that. dagen: we put you in like a camo jacket. the market slight losses here, we are also getting news on that settlement with the justice department, nicole petallides has you covered at the new york stock exchange. lauren: the dow down to the downside. the nasdaq and the s&p squeezing out some gains although very minimal. talking fractional news for the nasdaq and the s&p with the up arrow's up nearly two points as the s&p is up .34. a third of a point. very small moves despite the fact everybody still continues to believe you will not see any tapering from the fed anytime soon. some of the steel stocks doing ver
merkel's phone and allowed it to continue. it came out after edward snowden said the u.s. has spied on world leaders. what president obama spoke to chancellor merkel when the two spoke about the spying. >> the president said we're not going to do this going forward. >> but it may have been done in the past. >> we don't want to get into the business of inventorying everything we've done in the past but what we're looking at is how can we both make necessary reforms in how we gather intelligence and how can we be more transparent about what we're doing with our allies and the public. >> joining me now ambassador mark ginsburg. it's great to have you here. the white house finds itself caught between a rock and a hard place. now they have to come out and ask for forgiveness as opposed to permission, because they never would have gotten permission to do this. but this is not unheard of. this is what we do as a country. >> spies r us. >> we've been doing it for a long time. is it just the fact that we are surprised that it would get to this level and now expect to believe that the white h
to changing the retirement age. many of those recipients say they want more benefits. >> edward snowden could face a tough punishment if he ever returns to the u.s. many rejected his request for leniency. snowden was charged with espionage after leaking classified documents about the nsa surveillance program. he's currently in russia where he was granted asylum. >>> tha film about the life of nelson mandela will soon be near you. we have the nelson family reaction. >> i'm prepared to die. >> the long walk to freedom had a tough task. from nelson mandela's days as a young man committed to the struggle of racial equality. the film spares no details of his 27 years behind bars. a time that history and the film proved only made the man and his cause stronger. >> your struggle, your commitment, and your discipline has has brought me to stand before you today. >> we should remember where we come from, and that this freedom was hard, and that it was won at a very, very heavy price. >> the $35 million film documents the inner works of the family. the film marked the day in south africans went to the
contractor, edward snowden. >> the national security agency took the unusual step thursday of denying a report that'ves drop on the vatican phone calls and may have tapped in on pope francis before he was elected. what are you making up? is this a church, state issue? >> you got in on the consistent, the ones that depict the new pope, john? >> who knows. saved a lot of money. those guys have not done anything that was not known to the national security council and the white house and the idea of blaming these guys who are doing the job they were signed to do and oh my goodness, for miss feinstein, that there's a touch of hypocrisy here. >> there's a lot of outrage. i'm with clapper on this issue as well. i mean, i think because of the technological advances and the fact that we can now, you know, look in on people's cell phones, that you know, there has to be some more guidelines brought into this thing. but overall, friends spy on friends, it's not going to stop. >> what do you think of that? >> i think, well, i'm not enough people, clearly. there's no doubt that this has been g
about -- tell us about this drawing that was leaked alodge with some other edward snowden documents. does it show how the nsa broke into google. >> >> yes, think of google as having multiple data centers around the world. what apparently, it did, the fiberoptic connections, they tabbed into. they put a clip on or had a way to monitor what was going through those fiberoptic cables. that's something we've learned from snowden that they've been doing around the world. but it's particularly disturbing that it's done with google. google is unique. it's the only entim tientity in that has a mission to collect all the world's snfgs. remember, the nsa is only collecting information about people that they think are a threat to the united states and others. >> so, scott, some of the biggest names in high-tech are now working with the obama administrati administration what does this say about the government's handle on tech nothing. >> i think it was obviously a black eye. something this big should have been rolled out with a lot more test iing. anybody that's in the business knows that you do
can abuse the power that has been given to them. that includes rogue actors. edward snowden did not do what the government expected. in los angeles there was the public disorder and intelligence division that compiled information and used it for political purposes. information that is collected for law enforcement and security purposes is often used on political groups. >> if i could provide some perspective. the fbi operates through mandates that are codified in statute laws written by our congress and signed by the president into law. that process has produced, appropriately and necessarily, oversight, not just in the executive branch of government itself. the department of justice is obviously in the fbi as well. but also with the congress and through the court system and the judicial branch. that is to make sure that they and and day out, the work we are doing -- day in and day out, the work we are doing is representing the people of the united states and is what is required at that point in time. they have an expectation that we use those tools. they have an equal expectation that
to the "washington post" and documents it obtained from the nsa leaker edward snowden. according to this report, field collectors processed, get this, 181,28 181,280,466 new records in one month. an operation of this kind in the united states is illegal. of course the nsa is allowed to operate overseas but not here. what from google and yahoo. released a statement saying the company is troubled by the allegation. a yahoo spokeswoman says we have not given access to our data centers to the nsa or any other government agency. clearly that is not the accusation. the accusation is that the nsa broke in, not that anybody gave anybody permission. in other words, the nsa broke the law. of course there's more. an italian magazine reports that the nsa may have spied on the pope and some cardinals. sources say the magazine -- sources at the magazine have been told that the nsa eavesdropped on vatican phone calls possibly around the time the former pope benedict's successor was under discussion. possibly, it reports before the conclave that top secret meeting of cardinals. a vatican spokesman could not or
: the newest edward snowden documents report more spying on america's closest allies. in spain the nsa reports listening in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany a newspaper reports that president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on german chance large angela merkel's calls back in 2010 and contradicting white house assurances that the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report saying the following. nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving merkel. the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness, up to now, only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i i can tell you that the president assured chancellor that the united states has not monitored and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence experts are supposed to come to the united states to challenge their counterparts on the spying after a german official accused the u.s. of breaking german law on german soil but mike rogers defended the nsa surveillance on cnn sund
controversy continues to spread. in the wakeover it, edward snowden has had a meeting with a german legislator the, present that person with a letter, speaking the truth is not a crime, i am confident that with the support of the international community the government of united states will abandon this harmful practice. he's seeking some kind of clemency. are there any conditions under which president obama would consider clemency? >> none that have been discussed. >> none at all? >> none. >> it's not on the table? >> it's not been on the table. mr. snowden violated u.s. law. our belief has always been that he should return to the united states and face justice. >> finally, rand paul is our next guest, senator rand paul, do you agree with jay carney your white house colleague, that it would be awesome if rand paul ran for president in 2016? >> i suspect that the the 2016 republican nomination is going to be awesome no matter who runs. >> okay, dan pfeiffer, thanks very much. >>> let's go to senator rand paul right there. you heard dan pfeiffer say it's going to be an awesome race. are you goin
on and on and on. one assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and suprt the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and beli
closest allies. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. spain reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month. in germany, the newspaper records, president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn general sander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving murkle. the nsa says the willingness up to now to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president can assure the chancellor, the sungs not and will not 3407b tore the conversations of the chancellor. >> reporter: they are coming to the u.s. to challenge their american counterparts, after breaking quote german law on german soil. house chairman rodgers defended the nsa under surveillance on cnn sunday saying it was both well regulated and essential to keeping both americans and europeans safe from terrorism. >> i think the biggest
by aljazeera. >> edward snowden has a new job, his lawyer said he has found a tech support job. he has been living in the former soviet republic since august. the lawyer didn't name the company. he is set to start tomorrow. >> if you're getting one of these letters, just shop around in the new marketplace. you're going to get a better deal. >> president obama in boston on wednesday addressing the concerns of americans who are now getting those cancellations from their medical insurancers. he stood where mitt romney signed the massachusetts health care law seven years ago, the president saying massachusetts also had bumped along the way but it eventually became a success. while responding to the mis, mitt romney went to facebook to attack the president's health care law, writing: >> president obama actually learned the lessons of health care in massachusetts, millions more would not see their prices skyrocket and it would not have been a frustrating embarrassment. romney's remarks attracted more than 11 million likes on the networking site. >> kathleen sebelius got her chance to explain what
for edward snowden says he now has a job in the country where he's seeking asylum. beginning tomorrow, snowden will work for a major russian website where he will be performing maintenance. for security reasons, his attorney isn't naming the employer. snowden is charged with espionage and theft of government property. >>> a secret service report detailing chris brown's alleged assault assault of a man here in washington, d.c. is shedding new light on the possibility defense strategy. the document obtained by cnn suggests that brown's bodyguard could take the rap for the broken nose, while lawyers could question the credibility of one of the police officers investigating the case. brown is currently serving felony probation for his 2009 domestic violence conviction involving the pop star rihanna. a big day here in washington for the new new jersey senator, the former mayor cory booker was sworn in by the vice president joe biden. later met privately with president obama over at the white house. there was a special election this month to serve out the term of the late democratic senator
media. it just goes on and on, one assumes this is why edward snowden, his plan. but there does not seem to be a great deal of defense for nsa from people what you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking, why was your spying efforts your surveillance efforts. >> you are right, general alexander, he is a first rate general officer, but a first rate intel officer and spy, hands down the best guy. he has been in it for 8 years, and leaving of his own volition, it is time to get a new sit of eyes. it is unfair, the allegations, it makes no sense, they are left to deny and support the nsa themselves. they and clapper, director of national intelligence, is who is defending that major function that protects the united states, believe me, we would not have had no serious attack on the united states in all of these years, 12 years since 9/11 without this agency doing just incredible work. in protecting us. yet they stand there, having to take the fuselage of assaults on them by themselves with the director trying to broking to p. that is not
million calls in spain in one month. documents provided by nsa leaker edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a
. the investigations on benghazi and the irs, then it was the still ongoing embarrassing edward snowden leaks that raised questions about how much the president may or may not have known. september it continues with the president's indecision on whether or not to attack syria. he got a tiny bump when everyone was focused on republicans, but now between the government shut down and the bungled health care roll out, he hits the all time low with 42% approving of his job performing. that's getting close to bush territory. he went from 75% in 2002 and at this point in his second presidency was 39% around the time of katrina. democratic pollster. all right, guys. october shock waves is the theme of both of those polls. i went through the president's numbers, fred. for a long time he had just stayed above water when it comes to all of the washington mess. he was at the end of the day seen as somebody at least outside of it a little bit. not anymore. >> you had a shut down that was finished for a purpose and most voters don't know why. you have a health care roll out that doesn't seem to be going we
with edward snowden months ago, they start eed to b very upset in germany, partly because of their history with the secret police, and partly because they thought this president would be different. they thought president obama would do some different in national security than president bush. that's colored their opinion. as former secretary of state madeleine albright has said, everybody does it, i was even bugged by the french when i was u.s. ambassador to the u.n. >> julian, should he have known if the nsa was tapping a personal cell phone of a world leader? >> certainly, the president doesn't know everything going on with the nsa, and we shouldn't expect that. but when you're talking about the surveillance of world leaders and an issue that's been controversial for a while now, you would expect that there's some knowledge, eerlth by the president or people surrounding him. he hasn't said much about the second part of that, but i do think they're surprised that this was off the radar in the inner circles of the white house. >> christiane, you point out spying, one of the world's oldest p
a literal run in with a camera. >> usa today, edward snowden has a new job working for a russian website. it starts earlier this month. they didn't name the company for security reasons. "the washington post," employees of the department of homeland security may have boosted their pay with overtime they didn't earn. with o.t., it's $8.7 million a year. this tactic could add money to a paycheck and used to recruit new workers. >>> san diego union tribune, a police officer issued what many believe is the first ticket for driving while wearing google glass. oh, my god. this woman was caught after being caught for speeding. she plans to fight the ticket. it was blocking her vision and causing a distraction. >>> from "the washington post," the moment air travelers have been waiting for. as long as they don't allow talking on phones. >> what? >> the faa finally agreed to let passengers use electronic devices like tablets and phones throughout flights. >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: on this halloween travel day with costumes on full display at the airport, there was a treat awaiting travelers. >>
the firm whose background checks helped nsa leaker edward snowden and aaron alexis get clearances. they are accused of failing to perform quality control reviews in its investigations of potential government workers. >>> check out the white house. it's getting beautified or boo-tified for halloween. lit up in orange and purple lights. decorated with jack-o'-lanterns and cobwebs. imagine if the white house is in your neighborhood. what are we going to get? >> a long security line. >> that's true. >>> coming up on "new day," we heard the apologies from kathleen sebelius, the vice president. why? obvious, the obama care website. they're pledging to get it fixed. the question, is that enough. >>> and the startling new accusation against the nsa. the agency says it was not peering into yahoo! and google databases. what it is not denying is raising more questions. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses
a bombshell now report. it is based on documents that were leaked by edward snowden and it accuses the nsa of secretly tapping into google and yahoo's internet server. remember that original prism scandal we told you about before that involved complicated court orders that allow the nsa to subpoena records from those companies. with this latestde named muscular could have obtained the same records behind google and yahoo's back so the companies wouldn't necessarily know about it. reports suggest more than 180 million records may have been compromised. the nsa has denied that claim. >>> extreme weather alert to bring you. the forecast across the country is looking pretty scary this halloween. check out this brand-new video just in this morning. heavy rains and high winds forcing emergency crews to evacuate some residents from their homes in austin, texas. possible tornadoes are also forcing thousands of trick or treaters in indiana, kentucky and ohio to put their quest for candy off until tomorrow. >>> more on edward snowden. he gets a new job? he may be on the run for the u.s. government,
-mails and facebook posts at the end of the show. >>> meantime, the hits from fugitive leaker edward snowden keep oncoming, leaving the white house in damage control. the obama administration sending off reports now that president obama knew that the nsa was eavesdropping on german chancellor angela merkel's personal phone calls. this as we hear of another bombshell. the nsa reportedly monitored 60 million phone calls made in spain in just a single month. here's jay carney just a few moments ago talking about that scandal. >> was the president kept out of the loop about what the nsa was doing? >> josh, what i can tell you is two things.ibz first, i'm not going to get into details of internal discussions. but the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can, we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. today's world is highly interconnected. and the flow of large amounts of data is unprecedented. innovation is going to continue. if we're going to keep our citizens and our allies safe, we have to continue to stay ah
-- challenged the report, which surfaced from more material leaked by edward snowden. alexander said to his knowledge, the agency has not tapped the company's servers. two top german officials were in washington today, pursuing reports that the n.s.a. monitored chancellor angela merkel's cellphone. and in madrid, spanish prime minister mariano rajoy went before his parliament to address allegations that spain, too, was a target of u.s. surveillance. >> ( translated ): the key is to clarify what happened and generate confidence because without that, it is very difficult to work for the rights, liberties and security of our citizens. i hope we will get this. we have already requested the appearance of the head of spain's intelligence services and he will appear in this chamber as soon as possible. >> ifill: the government of china also weighed in, announcing today it will strengthen information security, to guard against outside surveillance. chinese police say they've arrested five people in a suicide car crash this week in beijing. on monday, an s.u.v. sped down a crowded sidewalk and explo
after the fact not during. let me ask briefly about the nsa story breaking, based on edward snowden leaks, foreign to foreign intelligence, nsa and british allies, british intelligence services are scooping up metadata, not specific content of e-mails and telephone calls unless they see a legitimate foreign target but scooping all this stuff, storing it for years and years in storage facilities i'm told around the world. how does this revelation affect our foreign policy? >> very damaging. the snowden revelations are becoming the most important security setbacks in the united states, not in terms of ability to collect information about terrorist threats, that's the least in terms of alienating allies. i found the story in the "washington post" disturbing for the following reason. we learned in 2011 the foreign intelligence corps, legal mechanism of oversight told nsa the activities collecting some data were illegal and needed to be changed. nsa saide yes, we will change those domestically. if the post story is accurate, at the same time they were changing domestic procedures, they w
assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and support the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and believe
the obama white house has been dealing not only with the website crash but also a new offering from edward snowden. a major spanish newspaper reporting today that the american spy agency may have been listening to at least 60 million phone calls in spain. this week two representatives from german chancellor angela merkel will visit washington. their leader is calling for talks about the nsa's reach after reports she was too big brothered by uncle sam. >> clearly damage has been done. i think we have to evaluate whether the costs of the method of gathering some intelligence greatly exceeds the benefit of that intelligence. >> joining me right now is north carolina republican congresswoman renee ellmers, a member of the house and energy commerce committee which is overseeing hearings on capitol hill into the federal health care website. congresswoman, it's great to have you with me. you had your chance to speak to the contractors last week and we have kathleen sebelius in the hot seat this week. what are the first questions that you want to ask of the secretary? >> well, what i'd like to kno
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
that they felt that way in covering this important story in mali. >> n.s.a. whistle blower edward snowden sounding off. >> we're going to tell you what's in his open letter. why he's asking the u.s. for clemency. >> it feels like 2012 all over again. mitt romney attacking president obama over health care. why the former presidential candidate jumped into the debate. >> a special look at aging around the globe, starting in afghanistan, where life expectancy is among the lowest in the world. >> we're taking a live look at egypt right now. the protests there, you can see breaking up very quickly, just an hour ago. we saw hundreds of people outside of the courthouse where mohamed morsi's trial has just been adjourned to the new year. we'll be right back. >> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> some democrats in washington are worried they're going to lose jobs over the ongoing n.s.a. scandal. we'll talk with an experienced democratic strategist. >> let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation. i'm he can specking a lot of low temperatures. >> a l
, but cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto has more. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. in spain, reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany the "sontag" newspaper reports president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls back in 2010, contradicting white house assurances the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn "general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel." the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness up to now only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence officials are expected to come to the u.s.
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